Glacier National Park — wild flowers

This time of the year, the wild flowers start to bloom. There are so many of them, I was not able to capture them all. I did manage to take a good picture for some of them. They are truly exquisite.

calypso orchid
calypso orchid

calypso orchild

wild strawberry
wild strawberry
wild strawberry
wild strawberry
trillium? but it seems to have way more pedals than a regular trillium.
trillium? but it seems to have way more pedals than a regular trillium.
trillium
trillium
yellow flower -- email me if you know the name
yellow flower — email me if you know the name
another yellow flower -- email me the name if you know
another yellow flower — email me the name if you know
another purple flower
another purple flower
yellow columbine
yellow columbine
purple flower
purple flower — email me if you know the name
indian paint brush
indian paint brush

Huckleberry was served everywhere around Glacier National Park. One morning I asked the waiter in Glacier Highland Restaurant where the huckleberries were coming from. I was surprised to learn that huckleberries were foraged from the wild and they can be as expensive as $80/gallon, but it’s usually about $40/gallon (4.5lbs == 1 gallon).  Still, it’s not cheap.

huckleberry
huckleberry
glacier lily
glacier lily

Glacier National Park — wildlife

This park is filled with wildlife. We saw black bear mom with babies, wolf, mountain goats (which is this park famous for), pine marten (on camera trap), golden eagle, osprey, chipmunks,  ground squirrel, deers and moose. I only captured some of them in my camera:

mule deer
mule deer — this one was actually right next to the trail. We were passing by each other within 2 feet. It’s so closed to us we worried it might just jump on us.
mule deer
mule deer — they are everywhere and no fear of humans.

The main reason why we are going to Glacier Nation Park is because of their world famous mountain goats. You can see them in other parts of the Rocky Mountains also but this park is the easiest place to find them. The mountain goats like to lick the minerals along the river banks. Each year after the snow melted, they all showed up regularly around a place called Goat Lick, which locates at the south east corner of the park. The very first time when we saw them, they were high up on the cliff on the north side of the freeway, not very photogenic. The second time when we went back, this time they were exactly at the cliff next to the river. For a brief moment, I thought they were going to fall off the cliff!

mountain_goat_on_cliff

family of mountain goats on cliff
family of mountain goats on cliff

This time, we got to get a pretty good look at them.

mountain_goat_4 mountain_goat_3 mountain_goat_2 mountain_goat_1

Besides the mountain goats, the bears who just came out of hibernation put up a good show also.

black_bear_cub_5 black_bear_cub_4 black_bear_cub_3 black_bear_cub_2 bear_mama black_bear_cub

Here are the chipmunk, osprey, and dusky grouse:

chipmunk
chipmunk
osprey
osprey

This grouse is so well-camouflaged, most of us passing by without seeing it. Thanks for Josiah’s spotting.

dusky_grouse
dusky grouse

For more spectacular pictures of the animals in the park, please visit my husband’s site: http://christofftravel.com/glacier/glacier.html

Hiking along Butano State Park

[mapsmarker marker=”1″]

This is one of the lesser known state park along the east side of highway 1 down south of Half Moon Bay. Usually, people drive down highway 1, their attention immediately got captured by the beautiful coast. However, if you just turn your head around a little, you will find a whole mountain range of hidden redwood-pine-oak forest just a couple miles inland.

When walking along the river, we saw a newt! Lucky day for us.

California Rough Skinned Newt
Rough Skinned Newt

We saw a lot of different native plants there.

Redwood Sorrel
redwood
Not sure what that is, maybe spicebush
Thimbleberry

Golden Gate Park Forage

Just joined a foraging walk this Sat. Before going to the walk, I already had some idea of what kinds of plants out there are edible. Like fennel, yarrow, sage, oxalis, etc. This trip certainly introduced more varieties of plants out there I can eat.

Common Mallow — This is the first plant the guide, Kevin Feinstein, introduced us. I tried the seed/fruit. Like he said, it tasted a bit like okra. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malva_neglecta

Common Mallow (Malva neglecta)
Common Mallow (Malva neglecta)

Cleavers —  The whole plant has tough tiny hairs feels like Velcro. Really don’t know I can eat that. By the texture of it, I would have never try.  http://www.eattheweeds.com/galium-aparine-goosegrass-on-the-loose-2/

Cleavers, Goosegrass, Bedstraw
Cleavers, Goosegrass, Bedstraw

Wild Radish  this really grows everywhere. I see them everywhere around Pacifica.

Wild Radish
Wild Radish
Wild Radish
Wild Radish

Plums — they are very common in Gold Gate Park.

plum, still very green
plum, still very green

Chickweed — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellaria_media

chickweed
chickweed

This fellow popped his/her head up while we were walking around. They look cute but they are actually very damaging to your yard!

gopher
gopher

Nasturtium

nasturtium
nasturtium

I don’t remember the name of this plant. Will update after I find out.

not sure about the name of this plant
not sure about the name of this plant
unknown plant
unknown plant

Common Nettle — Janet insists this is 莧菜. However, the english name for 莧菜 is Amaranthus. Need more investigation.

Common Nettle
Common Nettle

Wild Onion Lily — they smell like garlic and very good for making scrabble eggs.

Wild Onion Lily
Wild Onion Lily